Suspected ‘coup plotter’ who wrote ‘QAnon’ charges in prison

Written by Staff Writer at CNN Staff Writer at CNN A California man charged for his role in last fall’s Capitol militia protest has been sentenced to 41 months in prison. James Edward Anglin,…

Suspected 'coup plotter' who wrote 'QAnon' charges in prison

Written by Staff Writer at CNN Staff Writer at CNN

A California man charged for his role in last fall’s Capitol militia protest has been sentenced to 41 months in prison.

James Edward Anglin, a self-described “witch” and former Mexican prison inmate, was arrested in October in connection with a “pre-meditated, violent conspiracy,” according to prosecutors.

On Wednesday, he was sentenced in US District Court in Alexandria, Virginia.

“Jim Anglin’s premeditated, violent conspiracy to commit violence in the Nation’s Capital on September 22, 2017 demonstrated his true colors,” said Assistant Attorney General John P. Demers in a statement. “To make matters worse, he intentionally sought to deflect responsibility for his own crime, by blaming others.”

Anglin was accused of coaching militia members, “including a man who called himself “The QAnon Whisperer,” who was also jailed in the case, to gather at the Capitol on September 22, 2017.

Their intent was to inflict physical harm upon several government employees, including members of the media,” the US Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Virginia said in a statement.

“The QAnon group encouraged Anglin’s followers to use “scared talk” such as, ‘it could be us that gets the call,’ ‘we’ll be that seventh brother,’ and ‘we will not be silent at the public hearing.’ “

Police revealed the plot in a series of Facebook Live videos. The announcement was followed by three days of marches and counter-protests that degenerated into a melee.

Anglin is best known for an online troll persona — “The QAnon theory” — named after a fictitious imaginary brothel patron.

The conspiracy theory explains the plots, travails and “other occurrences” of President Donald Trump that are based on a vast collection of “psychological confirmation bias.”

In court records, prosecutors alleged Anglin had also held meetings with several militia members, including the man named as “The QAnon Whisperer.”

CNN has been unable to independently confirm The QAnon Whisperer’s identity.

On November 23, Anglin appeared before the US District Court in Virginia to plead guilty to two charges. He admitted that he, his followers and others had discussed violence against government officials, including members of the media, according to documents.

During the court proceedings, a mestizo-Mexican translator who confirmed that Anglin could be heard in the courtroom, testified that it was Anglin who stated: “On 18/9/2017, I was in West Hollywood in a public meeting with a group of people. The person in the room with me was reporting information about a topic so that he and others could act on it.”

In court documents, prosecutors noted Anglin had participated in a Twitter group that discussed ways to “shut down the American government.”

The blog posts described a conspiracy theory that dates back to President Theodore Roosevelt and that helped launch the “Tea Party” movement in the 1970s.

The group discussed an idea, known as “Liberty Hunt,” and “Operation Occupy the Beltway,” according to the court filings.

“The purpose of the Liberty Hunt was to collect as many bank records and personal identification numbers as possible, obtain national ID numbers, and make copies and possessions of each,” according to the documents.

In 2016, a Pennsylvania news station aired a 16-minute video of a confrontation in Pennsylvania during which Anglin and a separate group advocated on camera for violence against members of the media.

After Anglin’s arrest, he wrote that he was acting on behalf of “Liberty Honeys” in an online message.

“You think that’s tough? You talk about your God when you yell at him and threaten his life,” Anglin wrote. “He’s going to kill you.”

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