Sony’s CEO says Gamers don’t need Louis C.K.’s money

Activision Blizzard’s stance on Harvey Weinstein and Louis C.K. is all wrong, the CEO of Sony Interactive Entertainment said this week. John Kodera spoke out against Activision’s CEO Bobby Kotick on Thursday, after The…

Sony’s CEO says Gamers don’t need Louis C.K.’s money

Activision Blizzard’s stance on Harvey Weinstein and Louis C.K. is all wrong, the CEO of Sony Interactive Entertainment said this week.

John Kodera spoke out against Activision’s CEO Bobby Kotick on Thursday, after The Hollywood Reporter broke the news that the video game company planned to donate $1 million to groups fighting the #MeToo movement. The money came on the heels of Kotick’s criticism of C.K. and Weinstein, who were both accused of sexual misconduct by more than two dozen women.

“I totally disagree with you and for the not-so-privileged individuals, their mental state should be more important than whatever greed they may have,” Kodera told journalists during a briefing in London.

“Sony encourages my personal views. I think everyone should not feel condemned [by the #MeToo movement].”

Kodera was responding to a question about Kotick’s criticism of C.K. as part of a “C.K. Says Goodbye” letter published Monday. The head of one of the world’s largest publishers of interactive entertainment had questioned C.K.’s motives for stepping away from his public role, saying the comedian had “pretended” to be representative of men in Hollywood.

“I’ve sat at my desk with [game] creators who do incredible work but unfortunately some have gone down the same path as these people who had been accused of real wrong doing,” Kotick wrote. “We give these creators the freedom to make their creative decisions, but we expect them to be aware of the wider culture that we’re living in.”

This was Kotick’s second public argument with a prominent figure in the entertainment industry. In October, former Turner executive David Levy compared the #MeToo movement to “Vietnam Syndrome,” a saying used to describe veterans who refuse to accept what happened during the war after they had returned home.

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