Here’s how DC is trying to build a sun umbrella in our city that actually works

As the head of a green roof organization, watching wildfires fueled by an evil combination of strong Santa Ana winds and warm Santa Ana winds rattle California and burn scores of homes, it’s easy…

Here’s how DC is trying to build a sun umbrella in our city that actually works

As the head of a green roof organization, watching wildfires fueled by an evil combination of strong Santa Ana winds and warm Santa Ana winds rattle California and burn scores of homes, it’s easy to bemoan the way this kind of climate change can make the world as we know it untenable.

Not so easy to do is give up.

Cool Roofs for Cool Planet offers a sun umbrella to help alleviate this unnatural climate, as The Guardian reports. Technically, “cool roofs” begin and end with natural grass. In addition to slowing down the sun’s impact on the soil and the surrounding plants (a process that can take up to 12 years to complete), this is what gives you “cool” something in DC, D.C., and Portland.

The Guardian:

But this summer, as temperatures cracked 100°F in the DC area, sunshine becomes less and less of a cooling agent. So the green roof designers at Cool Roofs for Cool Planet wanted to add something extra, using artificial coolness to keep the heat at bay. So rather than relying on grass, they built a greenhouse and a green rooftop as part of the Georgetown solar festival that kicked off on 3 October.

Rather than depend on grass, they built a greenhouse and a green rooftop as part of the Georgetown solar festival that kicked off on 3 October.

In Portland, the Cool Roofs team went a step further: literally. On their 30,000-square-foot rooftop they built an enormous DIY greenhouse in addition to bringing photosynthesis back to the future.

In Portland, the Cool Roofs team went a step further: literally. On their 30,000-square-foot rooftop they built an enormous DIY greenhouse in addition to bringing photosynthesis back to the future.

Cool Roofs has a patent-pending design for the cool roof, the idea being that this makes cities that love an outdoor play area look like you’re living in a futuristic greenhouse. It also makes it possible to re-cycle materials like old roof shingles. Other roofs — in which grass grows, by the way — can create cheap energy that can offset the use of fossil fuels.

Those older roofs we promised that you could “green” your home for free? Well, at $35 million a house, you still wouldn’t make it any more green than this facility.

Leave a Comment