From computers to football and cows: The 15 most fascinating architectial projects

dushkin61/Thinkstock By Jen Rosenberg The following article is part of The World’s 50 Most Intriguing Architecture and Design Projects, a series of shortlist picks from the nine issues of the Architecture and Design Network:…

From computers to football and cows: The 15 most fascinating architectial projects

dushkin61/Thinkstock

By Jen Rosenberg

The following article is part of The World’s 50 Most Intriguing Architecture and Design Projects, a series of shortlist picks from the nine issues of the Architecture and Design Network:

A Family Clubhouse in Quebec

This unique cantilevered family cottage sits atop the Côte-Bécifées mountains in Quebec and offers a beautiful perch for rooftop fun. The view from the top may turn heads and be a highlight of any day; head there on a summer weekday for fully summery views.

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Architect

Kübler-Ross disorder

Researchers have used interventions like taking away a person’s TV and depriving them of fresh air to try to treat severe depression (or to reduce the effects of PTSD)—something that’s accomplished with help from people. Another clinical model is biofeedback that calculates electrical impulses generated by the brain, which when sent in a defined pattern will mitigate the symptoms of depression. Other techniques, like SPAS, help people live life in a more natural way with less fear of cognitive or behavioral repercussions.

Placing an architectural intervention in the minds of people has also been explored by architects. These interventions are not meant to leave or solve problems, however. Some choose to provide such practices as new ground and supportive walls on existing homes or into new buildings. Other, such as crop circles, are work that mirrors and reflects the natural landscape and some add furniture to improve the placement of various interior objects, providing softer surfaces or easier entry points. On the body, designers have also been exploring meditation and mindfulness practices.

Theresa Mascuja / Architecture de Catalunya, Anu Yrzaba, Daliso Chapimbas, and Kukje Borun Architects

Linked elements create order and peace for rural dwellers

The civil engineering practice has invested a lot of research and planning in bringing a sense of security and order to areas where population is growing or where traffic is increasing. Something as simple as setting up small loop roads might reduce traffic, and moving together additional lanes may improve the quality of life.

One architectural approach has been linking several horizontal building materials together in a composite to create a single structure that lessens the load on the backbone. Another approach allows timber frames to be wrapped around a stone foundation to create a smooth face. Other works use the analogy of a wall similar to the way builders set up walls to alleviate problems with sagging and splintering. In the case of a house built in the Netherlands, the transparent lattice-clad walls showed an excess of impenetrable porcelain dust between steps and could prevent staining in the sky.

Dulwich Buzzard Architects/Photoviews/Sandra Beschier

Glasgow building: Bread & Bread

The Gherkin development in the City of London has reinterpreted the old building style known as mid-block housing. The idea behind this celebrated example of triangulation is two social housing buildings joining together at the rear of the site. But it was not just the nearby traditional housing that was changed. A traffic signal was changed to reflect the nearby shops. The outside elements were designed to match the flats and outside plinth on the ground level will display the history of the site. Some of the plinth will be wrapped in a seasonal Victorian patio for sitting.

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