BBC presenter, activist, and solo Queen: The Countess of Carnarvon

Eden was a pacifist and was a lifelong user of medical marijuana Irish born Countess Clarissa Eden, a poet, novelist, painter and a prominent political activist and suffragette has died at the age of…

Eden was a pacifist and was a lifelong user of medical marijuana

Irish born Countess Clarissa Eden, a poet, novelist, painter and a prominent political activist and suffragette has died at the age of 101.

Eden was the second British Countess of Carnarvon, wife of the 1st Earl of Carnarvon, and remained a classically glamorous queen of the castle.

Eden penned a number of satirical sketches as well as the poem ‘The Lord Royal.’

The Countess’s husband, the Earl of Carnarvon, lived at Stourhead, but their family joined him for a short period in the mid 20th century.

Eden was one of the very few female protagonists in the novels of Charlotte Brontë, especially of Jane Eyre.

Eden later went on to embark on a long career in propagandistic journalism and became the nation’s “at home” celebrity.

Eden was known as a tireless BBC journalist and was the first presenter of television’s Saturday Childrens.

The Countess also hosted public debate programmes and wrote for Panorama and The Arts programme.

In later years, the Countess was diagnosed with dementia and she continues to advocate for her personal use of cannabis, because she describes it as a “high mood shot”.

All is known about her battle with the illness is that her last memory from working on BBC Four was getting up to turn off some of the computers in the studio and “it was like a ghost.”

Eden was married for 60 years to the 1st Earl of Carnarvon from her birth in 1897 until he died in 1988.

Clarissa Eden, the 2nd British Queen Consort. Photograph: Rex

“She certainly encouraged all of her daughters and grandchildren in their own pursuits, whatever they were.”

Recalling the remarkable life of her father’s bride, Anna Morton, one of his daughters, Sue Marsh, recalled her grandmother ‘The Duchess’ as being hard working and living a life ‘full of imagination’.

The Countess’ granddaughter, Karen Ross Hardy, said: “Clare was as bright as they come, but equally a regular person.

“She was married to the 11th Earl of Carnarvon from her mid-30s, but the Countess found this quite difficult.

“She tried to be a housewife and she liked to keep pace with the day.

“Her marriage was normal.”

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